News about the Third Edition of the Roman Missal
WASHINGTON (November 18, 2010) — After meeting in Baltimore for the annual Fall General Assembly of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), the Committee on Divine Worship issued a statement affirming the timeline of the implementation of the Roman Missal, Third Edition.

In the statement, Bishop Arthur Serratelli of Paterson, New Jersey, outgoing chairman of the committee, said “there is assurance that the published text will be available in more than ample time for implementation in Advent 2011. It is good to note also that the catechetical preparation for implementation is already underway and has proceeded with much enthusiasm and wide acceptance by both clergy and laity. It is clear at this point in time that there is an attitude of openness and readiness to receive the new text.” The full statement is available on the USCCB’s Divine Worship homepage: www.usccb.org/liturgy.

The Roman Missal, Third Edition, the book of prayers used in the worship of the Roman rite, was promulgated by Pope John Paul II as part of the Jubilee Year 2000. The U.S. bishops completed their approval of the translation of the Missal into English at their November 2009 meeting. The translation received recognitio, or approval, from the Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments in spring 2010.

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Comments

# Lupe M. Figueroa
Tuesday, January 18, 2011 9:36 AM
Am looking forward to attending a series of classes regarding changes to the Roman Missal. Will accept all information regarding changes made to Roman Catholic Liturgy or Catholic religion in general.
# Danielle Knott
Wednesday, March 16, 2011 2:37 PM
Dear Lupe,
You might be interested in the various Mystical Body, Mystical Voice workshops that will be occuring throughout the country. Visit their Web site: http://www.mysticalbodymysticalvoice.org/

Hope this helps!
Danielle

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